Tag Archive for automobile safety

Self-driving cars–the hacking factor

The public’s perception of our cyber vulnerability hasn’t so far been really tested . We’ve been lucky to get away with our critical infrastructure practically undefended. However, sooner or later we’ll run out of out luck, and we’ll get hurt– badly.
The major reason for our apathy in the face of cyber attacks is probably the tendency to react mostly to something that is tangible. But as yet we haven’t had much in the way of tangible losses to cyber attacks: banks have been able to reimburse money lost in their hacked customers’ accounts, stolen identities have generally been somewhat restored, we aren’t aware of anyone being killed due to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) hack – in other words, a small part of the population has experienced inconveniences, but not tangible losses.
The latest example of a cavalier attitude to this danger comes (surprise, surprise!) from the auto industry. Cars have been hijacked in experiments for quite some time, but these were limited to the Government and some private labs. Car manufacturers have surely been aware of the potential problem. Indeed, Fiat Chrysler was notified of the successful hijack of one of their cars quite some time ago, but only after the media exposed it did they recall 1.4 million cars. And of course the vulnerability isn’t limited to Fiat Chrysler– it’s far wider.
This situation is fast heading for a test. Significant efforts are being made to develop self-driving vehicles, and the results are already very promising. However, the parties involved seem oblivious of the fact that a self-driving car is much more vulnerable to cyber attacks other than the kind that affected the Fiat-Chrysler vehicle. The latter can be somewhat mitigated by separating the car’s communication equipment from its primary performance systems. But clearly this isn’t going to be the case with self-driving cars – outside interaction is going to be a major factor of their safety features. Those very safety features themselves can be manipulated by a malicious party, with catastrophic results. There would be lost lives along with many other unpleasant results. Hacking self-driving vehicles would likely become a favorite weapon of focused assassins (not to mention unfocused crazies who would prefer it to random shooting in movie theaters). That would certainly be a very real test of our tolerance for remaining undefended in cyberspace.
The obvious conclusion that begs to be considered here is that the entities that are working on the self-driving car had better solve the cyber security problem now instead of finding out that their technological marvels cannot be certified for safety reasons. Or worse, pushing the certification through and then facing the inevitable consequences.